Bluebonnets Brighten Stormy Day

2017, Bluebonnets, New Braunfels, TX

Pictures of bluebonnets ūüôā

Bluebonnets! That’s not code for poetry, nor a poem title (yet?), nor even writing-related…

I’m traveling and stopped to photograph some bluebonnets yesterday, near New Braunfels, TX.¬† We parked in a grocery store lot and were able to walk along a sidewalk that ran between the stores and the highway.

Right now it seems that the bluebonnets are flowering along roadways and in some broader patches, but from what I read online it seems that they aren’t really at their peak yet. But viewing flowers along a highway can be difficult if there isn’t a safe place to stop, so we felt pretty lucky to find this patch.

I was also lucky¬†to¬†get these shots at all. The weather wasn’t really cooperating. It seems like a bright sunny day would really make the blues pop. But it was gray all afternoon, with ominous clouds made of dark and darker grays rolling overhead.

A few moments after I took these pictures,¬†a thunderstorm let loose. It was quite the deluge.¬† Have you seen road signs that say “Road May Flood”?¬† This was¬†the kind of storm for which those signs were created!

But no storm pics, only flowers.

In a couple of these you can see some of the clouds, but these photos don’t do the clouds justice.

2017, Bluebonnets, New Braunfels, TX
2017, Bluebonnets, New Braunfels, TX

Here the clouds look all soft, but that’s just the camera fooling you:

2017, Bluebonnets, New Braunfels, TX
2017, Bluebonnets, New Braunfels, TX

Besides the relatively dark day, and the fact it was close to sunset, the other problem I had was the wind. The constant and sometimes gusting wind made it difficult to get a shot of the bluebonnets¬†that wasn’t blurry. These are the better ones:

2017, Bluebonnets, New Braunfels, TX
2017, Bluebonnets, New Braunfels, TX

I have lots that look like this one, not really sharp enough:

2017, Bluebonnets, New Braunfels, TX
2017, Bluebonnets, New Braunfels, TX

This is probably the sharpest of the broader shots:

2017, Bluebonnets, New Braunfels, TX
2017, Bluebonnets, New Braunfels, TX

On the positive side, since the bluebonnets grew right up to the sidewalk, I was able to get a close-up.

Enjoy!

2017, Bluebonnets, New Braunfels, TX
2017, Bluebonnets, New Braunfels, TX

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Poet Reads: How Heavy the Breath of God by Sheryl St. Germain

The tropical stays with you, long after you’ve left the tropics

This¬†book, How Heavy the¬†Breath of God, is one¬†I return to again and again for its sense of being simultaneously away while also¬†coming home to oneself.¬† The poems are arranged in a travel sequence, starting in tropical locations such as Ecuador and Guatemala and ending up back in the southern U.S., in Texas. While not necessarily literal,¬†the arrangement does feel¬†logical. There’s an outward to inward arc to the work as a whole. Continue reading “A Poet Reads: How Heavy the Breath of God by Sheryl St. Germain”

Ou-Yang Hsiu’s Love & Time, Part 2 of 2: “Far Off Mountains”

A Poet Reads

“Far Off Mountains” makes both moment and memory

Sometimes what a poem does is remind us of a mood or moment. It conjures up our own memories even if we do not have enough information to understand the poet’s specific memory. The Ou-Yang Hsiu poem,¬†“Far Off Mountains”¬†¬†from Love & Time, translated by J. P. Seaton, works this way.

Continue reading “Ou-Yang Hsiu’s Love & Time, Part 2 of 2: “Far Off Mountains””

2 Poems in Shot Glass Journal

Hinge

Two New Poems — And A Little Gloss

I have two poems in the current issue of Shot Glass Journal, January 2017, Issue #21. It¬†published the¬†beginning of February. I thought I’d¬†posted this. . . but it turns out, you can have too many drafts in your WordPress dashboard. Thank you Shot Glass Journal for taking a chance on my work! Especially on “If Anyone Can : Say Anything” which is in unconventional form. A little gloss on each poem is below.

Continue reading “2 Poems in Shot Glass Journal”

Science Fiction Story “Plug & I” Now Available

new science fiction Offworlders story -- Plug & I, by T. M. Adair

Plug & I, an Offworlders story, now available

For some time now, you’ve probably seen the “coming soon” notice for science fiction short stories on my publications page.¬†The first, Plug & I, is now available in ebook on Amazon. It’s about 6500 words– a short read of¬†20-25 pages. Because it’s short, it’s available for $0.99. Or you can read it for free if you are part of Kindle Unlimited. It won’t be available in physical form until there are some¬†stories to bundle with it. It is the first new science fiction Offworlders story available. Continue reading “Science Fiction Story “Plug & I” Now Available”

Ou-Yang Hsiu’s poems, “Love & Time” translated by J. P. Seaton, Part 1 of 2

A Poet Reads

Selections of Ou-Yang Hsiu’s poetry appear in the¬†collection “Love & Time, The Poems of Ou-Yang Hsiu,” translated by J. P. Seaton,¬†1989, Copper Canyon Press.

Love & Time, The Poems of Ou-Yang Hsiu, tr. J.P. Seaton, 1989, Copper Canyon Press
Love & Time, The Poems of Ou-Yang Hsiu, tr. J.P. Seaton, 1989, Copper Canyon Press

This post is part 1 of 2.  Part 1 will cover form and background. Part 2 will cover content, and look closely at one translated poem.

Background: Ou-Yang Hsiu

Ou-Yang Hsiu lived from 1007-1072 in Sung Dynasty China. Raised in poverty and primarily self-educated, he became both a scholar and a government administrator. He was known for his strong code of ethics.

Ou-Yang Hsiu didn’t follow the approved pattern of highly formal poems on limited, conventional subject matter, full of obscure allusions.

Which sounds like about what¬†the non-poetry reader thinks of poetry today. Hard to understand, needing someone to decode it for the reader. Something only for the in-crowd. You can’t really blame people.¬†Schools tend to reinforce this approach.¬†A student¬†deciphers a poem¬†to figure out ‘what it really means’ instead of understanding it, at least on one level, without overly-educated interpretation. Continue reading “Ou-Yang Hsiu’s poems, “Love & Time” translated by J. P. Seaton, Part 1 of 2″